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Engine oil

Gabriel

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Hi guys what engine oil ar you using for RCZ THP 200hp ?
0w30 ? Or 5w30 ?
 

Pedro

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Mine's the 200 sport its been using Quartz Ineo 5w30 MC3 for the last 5+ yrs it runs perfect if your is in the higher mileage range I would steer clear of 0w30 ?
 

M19YEA

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I have 0w20 in my 200 (I know there’s always 1 :rolleyes:).
 

ZerokoolRCZ

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Hi all,
I was just thinking the same, only had my THP 200 since July '23,
castor website say Magnatec 0W-30 C2, and then Halfords say every thing from 0W-30 uptp 5W-40, my car only is a 2013 with only 49k on it.

Your thoughts?

Thanks
 

Claret63

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As Pedro says Quartz ineo 5-30, if it’s good enough for the R and is manufacturer spec across the range, why would you be looking at anything else?

Perfect oil for the prince engine.
 
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Lanciaman

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Except another thread on here says peugeot revised it and ineos 0/30 should be used.... Mine going for oil change next week with that bought... Got me concerned now!
 

Claret63

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Don’t worry there is absolutely nothing to worry about, a low viscosity (0 that is won’t kill your engine compared to a 5 no difference really) it’s the high viscosity that can damage bearings if wrongly chosen.

The only consequence of using a low viscosity will be leaks, usually through the obvious places, as previously mentioned.
.
 

Lanciaman

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Thanks for that. Mine on 33k miles so hopefully be OK on that front. Tho reading some posts on here that's no guarantee!
 

lfe

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The main reason to use less viscosity oil is to reduce fuel consumption, not better lubrication
And a lower viscosity than recommended should be avoided, read the article.
 
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lfe

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The photo is from the maintenance book of my 2010 RCZ.

What is the meaning of the graph on the left? titled "Viscosity Fields according to the amplitude of ambient temperatures"
Depending on the temperature, can more viscous oil be used?

In the last two oil changes I have put Quartz 9000 5w40, approved according to B71 2296 and the engine runs a bit quieter, smoother and oil consumption has been reduced.


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Flanners

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The oil viscosity/rating can be changed for use in the engine within the parameters given in the graph dependent on the climate/weather of the country the car is in, so generally the hotter the clime the 'thicker' the oil....so a 0w30/5w30 for UK and if in Southern Spain a 10w40 or 15w40. To be honest as you and other's have said a lot is manufacturers striving for mpg with thin oils in modern cars.

I use 10w60 in a Fiat Coupe turbo and have done for nigh on 20yrs which is the thickest oil manufacturer recommends, probably 'too thick' for UK winter, but had no ill effects no smoke on idle, still on same turbo etc at 115K miles, with good oil pressure in Summer after spirited driving.
 
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Claret63

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Flanners is indeed correct, but I think it’s also important to point out that if you go with a higher viscosity of oil than the manufacturer recommends (ie a 60) you are running the risk of damaging the crank bearings, as it may be to thick to flow between the manufacturer tolerances, hence leading to poor lubrication of the bearing shells.
 

Pascal

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hello
i had my chain tensioner replaced last week due to a rattling noise .the timing belt was completely replaced last year , i had driven about 5000 km and it started making noise again .
I also had a conversation with the chief mechanic who told me that even with the new car they are reverting to 5W30 oil instead of the 0W30 there would be too much wear.
so at the next maintenance I will change to 5w30.
 

Flanners

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if you look at the chart above according to Peugeot there is absolutely nothing in it from a 0w30 to a 5w30 if switching a 5w40 would be the way to go for possibly better protection (esp turbocharged) at higher temps (being 40) in Summer..more important for me reading about all this is the added detergent packages and at the very least frequent oil changes; mine is yearly with less than 1K miles a year.
 
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Digger

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Totally confused now. Contradictory advice opinions even dealerships are not sure what oil to use in their range of Peugeot vehicles
 

Lanciaman

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I think the best option is the ineos 0/30 but as importantly change it frequently. I'll go no more than 3 or 4k miles or annually but given I've done 200 in miles since November annually for me.
 

Flanners

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Totally confused now. Contradictory advice opinions even dealerships are not sure what oil to use in their range of Peugeot vehicles


Most confusion it seems is ignorance possibly from said mechanic, as said the difference is negligible as shown in the graph above.....as long as the oil conforms to given specs, determime what you want to pay then keep tabs on the level (do not trust the cars systems to check) and change it often. Job done (the graph above is from a petrol THP)

Oilman on forums had this to say

read on many forums about 0w and 5w oils being too thin.

0w-40, 5w-40, 10w-40 and 15w-40 are all the same thickness (14 centistokes) at 100degC.

Centistokes (cst) is the measure of a fluid's resistance to flow (viscosity). It is calculated in terms of the time required for a standard quantity of fluid at a certain temperature to flow through a standard orifice. The higher the value, the more viscous the fluid.

As viscosity varies with temperature, the value is meaningless unless accompanied by the temperature at which it is measured. In the case of oils, viscosity is generally reported in centistokes (cst) and usually measured at 40degC and 100degC.

So, all oils that end in 40 (sae 40) are around 14cst thickness at 100degC.

This applies to all oils that end in the same number, all oils that end in 50 (sae 50) are around 18.5cst at 100degC and all oils that end in 60 (sae 60) are around 24cst at 100degC.

With me so far?

Great!

Now, ALL oils are thicker when cold. Confused? It's true and here is a table to illustrate this.

SAE 40 (straight 40)

Temp degC.........................Viscosity (thickness)

0..........................................2579cst
20..........................................473cst
40..........................................135cst
60..........................................52.2cs t
100........................................ 14cst
120.........................................8.8cst

As you will see, there is plenty of viscosity at 0degC, in fact many times more than at 100degC and this is the problem especially in cold weather, can the oil flow quick enough to protect vital engine parts at start up. Not really!

So, given that an sae 40 is 14cst at 100degC which is adequate viscosity to protect the engine, and much thicker when cold, how can a 0w oil be too thin?

Well, it can't is the truth.

The clever part (thanks to synthetics) is that thin base oils can be used so that start up viscosity (on say a 5w-40 at 0degC) is reduced to around 800cst and this obviously gives much better flow than a monograde sae 40 (2579cst as quoted above).

So, how does this happen, well as explained at the beginning, it's all about temperature, yes a thin base oil is still thicker when cold than at 100degC but the clever stuff (due to synthetics again) is that the chemists are able to build these oils out of molecules that do not thin to less than 14cst at 100degC!

What are the parameters for our recommendations?

Well, we always talk about good cold start protection, by this we mean flow so a 5w will flow better than a 10w and so on. This is why we recommend 5w or 10w as the thickest you want to use except in exceptional circumstances. Flow is critical to protect the engine from wear!

We also talk about oil temps, mods and what the car is used for. This is related to the second number xw-(XX) as there may be issues with oil temperatures causing the oil to be too thin and therefore the possibility of metal to metal contact.

This is difficult to explain but, if for example your oil temp does not exceed 120degC at any time then a good "shear stable" sae 40 is perfectly capable of giving protection.

"Shear stability" is important here because if the oil shears it thins and that's not good!

However, if you are seeing temperatures in excess of 120degC due to mods and track use etc then there is a strong argument to using an sae 50 as it will have more viscosity at these excessive temperatures.

There are trade offs here. Thicker oils cause more friction and therefore more heat and they waste power and affect fuel consumption so it's always best to use the thinnest oil (i.e. second number) that you can get away with and still maintain oil pressure.

I hope this helps explain a bit.

Cheers

Guy.
 
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