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Beautiful photographs of your RCZ

K.S

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Yeah agreed, definitely there is a point at which its too much, but yours looks almost perfect, only thing I would think left to do is to crack open those headlights and get them black chromed, I think that will complete the look. Like this for example (I know this is the updated front but you get the idea):

View attachment 14384
Have thought about tinting lights, haven't seen this method before, looks nice👍
 

RCZ-mad

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Have thought about tinting lights, haven't seen this method before, looks nice👍
Yeah I plan on doing this on a white RCZ - headlights black, adding LED light strips to the headlights and finally blackening the foglight area, just as you see in the pic below. I think the LED light strip particularly gives it a contemporary supercar look:

PeugeotRCZ-headlights and foglights treatment.png
 

hellomotto

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Is there a reason why there is virtually no one who has smoked/tinted their front/rear lights???

I kind of think the front would look amazing. The back maybe so so

Im going to try on mine
 

RCZ-mad

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Is there a reason why there is virtually no one who has smoked/tinted their front/rear lights???

I kind of think the front would look amazing. The back maybe so so

Im going to try on mine
I wondered that too, but I could think of five reasons;
  1. cracking the shell when trying to separate it from the main light unit is a risk some people don't want to take
  2. the amount of effort required is greater than they are prepared to put in
  3. they can't have the car off the road for the day or two needed to get it done
  4. the risk that when it's all put back together, it's not sealed properly and you start getting condensation inside the unit
  5. they just don't think it would look good
 

hellomotto

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I wondered that too, but I could think of five reasons;
  1. cracking the shell when trying to separate it from the main light unit is a risk some people don't want to take
  2. the amount of effort required is greater than they are prepared to put in
  3. they can't have the car off the road for the day or two needed to get it done
  4. the risk that when it's all put back together, it's not sealed properly and you start getting condensation inside the unit
  5. they just don't think it would look good
im looking to just put a film over it, not a dissemble and spray, as i agree it could cause problems, and the film would be easily removable.
 

RCZ-mad

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im looking to just put a film over it, not a dissemble and spray, as i agree it could cause problems, and the film would be easily removable.
In that case, probably because it might fail roadworthy. You'll have to look up the regs for your state
 

hellomotto

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In that case, probably because it might fail roadworthy. You'll have to look up the regs for your state
if im not wrong tintning headlights/rear is ok, as long as the emitted light is fine,

but good point for insurance, they are very picky... i will need to investigate
 

RCZ-mad

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if im not wrong tintning headlights/rear is ok, as long as the emitted light is fine,

but good point for insurance, they are very picky... i will need to investigate
When they are on; tail and stop lights are red, indicators amber and headlights, parking lights and reversing lights are white.

From Vic gov vehicle standards information (as an example):
  • Generally, all motor vehicles must be fitted with functional headlamps, stop lamps, front and rear position (parking) lamps, a number plate lamp and turn signal lamps emitting light of the specified colour
So, if you were to put tint film on headlights, as long as they emit a white light when turned on, it should be fine.

HOWEVER...

Even if the light looks white to you through the tint (as headlights should emit white) it's still possible that the light emitted is not within the range permissible by law.

Only by testing with specialised instruments will they know for sure if your headlight is emitting the correct light range.

Therefore, even IF the headlight still emits white light and the right light range, its still possible you will most likely get defected by police since its not their job to do the scientific testing of your headlights. They will simply see a modification to your vehicle headlight which may affect safety and give you a defect notice.

It's at that point you will have to get it tested properly and then you will find out for certain if they emit the right light range. If they don't, then you'll have to remove the tint and you'll be out of pocket for the tint AND the fee for clearing the defect notice.

From my perspective, it's a near certainty you will get defected, not if but when. Do you really want to go through the trouble of having to get it tested? And in all probability, it will fail anyway and you'll have to remove the tint.

SOLUTION: If you really want to darken your headlights, then the best option is to open them up and get the inner reflective surface painted (black chrome preferably) because then the outer casing is still transparent as it was from the factory and the light emitted won't be affected as it won't be passing through tint.

I suggest black chrome because some of the light intensity from the headlights is due to the reflection from the inner chromed surfaces, and a black chrome will at least retain some of that.

Even with that, its still a possibility you could be defected but much less likely because they'll see the external clear casing hasn't been interfered with at all when they look closely AND a lot of cars from factory have blackened internal areas anyway, so surely most police will just assume its OEM.

Plus it helps that blacked out headlights were an option for these cars from factory anyway ;)

The first pic is the factory option from a Mk.2 RCZ, and the second pic is from someone on this forum who blackened their headlights internally;

RCZ - gen2 headlights - blacked out.png

rcz - blacked out headlights.png
 

hellomotto

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When they are on; tail and stop lights are red, indicators amber and headlights, parking lights and reversing lights are white.

From Vic gov vehicle standards information (as an example):
  • Generally, all motor vehicles must be fitted with functional headlamps, stop lamps, front and rear position (parking) lamps, a number plate lamp and turn signal lamps emitting light of the specified colour
So, if you were to put tint film on headlights, as long as they emit a white light when turned on, it should be fine.

HOWEVER...

Even if the light looks white to you through the tint (as headlights should emit white) it's still possible that the light emitted is not within the range permissible by law.

Only by testing with specialised instruments will they know for sure if your headlight is emitting the correct light range.

Therefore, even IF the headlight still emits white light and the right light range, its still possible you will most likely get defected by police since its not their job to do the scientific testing of your headlights. They will simply see a modification to your vehicle headlight which may affect safety and give you a defect notice.

It's at that point you will have to get it tested properly and then you will find out for certain if they emit the right light range. If they don't, then you'll have to remove the tint and you'll be out of pocket for the tint AND the fee for clearing the defect notice.

From my perspective, it's a near certainty you will get defected, not if but when. Do you really want to go through the trouble of having to get it tested? And in all probability, it will fail anyway and you'll have to remove the tint.

SOLUTION: If you really want to darken your headlights, then the best option is to open them up and get the inner reflective surface painted (black chrome preferably) because then the outer casing is still transparent as it was from the factory and the light emitted won't be affected as it won't be passing through tint.

I suggest black chrome because some of the light intensity from the headlights is due to the reflection from the inner chromed surfaces, and a black chrome will at least retain some of that.

Even with that, its still a possibility you could be defected but much less likely because they'll see the external clear casing hasn't been interfered with at all when they look closely AND a lot of cars from factory have blackened internal areas anyway, so surely most police will just assume its OEM.

Plus it helps that blacked out headlights were an option for these cars from factory anyway ;)

The first pic is the factory option from a Mk.2 RCZ, and the second pic is from someone on this forum who blackened their headlights internally;

View attachment 14478

View attachment 14479
I just spoke to the insurwnce company, which was in the phillipines,
That was like talking to my pet goldfish

I cant find it in my pds either.

I dont see tinted lights as much as i used to ,
Maybe as you said its put in the "too hard" basket

Will investigate more...
 
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